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Karl Gordon is an Assistant Astronomer at Steward Observatory, University of Arizona and is a member of the MIPS Instrument and Science Teams. His main scientific research interests are in the field of interstellar dust, including the observational properties of dust grains (eg., extinction curves, Extended Red Emission, and infrared dust emission) and radiative transfer in dusty systems (eg., reflection nebulae and galaxies). The LMC is an obvious bridge between work on Milky Way dust and dust in other galaxies. His main functional role for SAGE is to lead the team responsible for the data reduction and extraction of photometry from the SAGE MIPS observations.

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Joseph L. Hora is the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Project Scientist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He is a member of the team that was responsible for building and calibrating the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. His research interests include star formation, planetary nebulae, and infrared instrumentation.

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Doug Kelly is a staff scientist at the University of Arizona. He is a member of the MIPS instrument team, and he was chief test engineer during the development of the instrument. His scientific interests include mass loss, late stages of stellar evolution, star formation in galaxies, and the evolution of galaxies in clusters. Doug is currently serving as chief systems engineer for the near-infrared camera on the James Webb Space Telescope. Doug's interests in the LMC include dust properties and stellar mass loss in a metal-poor environment, feedback of ejected material into the ISM, and the evolution of the mass-losing stars.

 

Claus Leitherer received his Ph.D. in 1985. Following postdoctoral positions in Heidelberg and Boulder he joined Space Telescope Science Institute in 1988, where he is currently an Associate Astronomer. His responsibilities at STScI include the panel review and proposal selection process within the Science Policies Division. His main scientific interests are atmospheres and evolution of hot stars, resolved and unresolved massive stellar populations, the stellar content and interstellar medium of star-forming galaxies, starburst activity in galaxies, and spectrophotometric evolution models of galaxies.

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Suzanne Madden is a research scientist at the Service d'Astrophysique (SAp) of the CEA in Saclay, France. She was on the ISOCAM instrument team and is on the Herschel SPIRE and PACS teams and the Planck HFI team. Her science interests include the interplay between star formation and the ISM in the wide variety of galactic environments. She studies the IR to mm properties of dust, the ionised gas and photodissociation regions/molecular clouds. The LMC allows us to zoom in on star formation and the ISM properties of our nearby neighbor. Exploring the physical properties of the various components of this well-resolved low metallicity galaxy in detail, will help us understand the intrinsic properties of more distant, unresolved galaxies.

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Ciska Markwick-Kemper is an assistant professor at the University of Virginia. Her work focusses on understanding the formation and processing of circumstellar and interstellar dust, mainly by studying the mineralogical composition and grain properties by means of infrared spectroscopy. She is also interested in mass loss processes in post-main-sequence stars.

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Marilyn Meade is a Researcher at the University of Wisconsin. Marilyn has over 30 years experience processing data, starting with the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, and including the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimetry Experiment, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and now the Spitzer Space Telescope. Marilyn helped develop the Wisconsin IRAC pipeline, and keeps it running 24 hours a day. She is also a member of the GLIMPSE team.

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Jeremy Mould is Director of NOAO, a member of the Spitzer MIPS team, and interested in the late stages of stellar evolution.

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